Trump: America’s Most Unfiltered President

president donald trump close up

In my earlier piece on the Niger ambush deaths of four American soldiers, I made a reference to Donald Trump being the most unfiltered US president in modern history.

Puerto Rico’s experience with Trump and Hurricane Maria offers a close look at how unfiltered behavior works.

With all due love, Puerto Rico is a colony, not a US state, and the policy behaviors of virtually every American President since the island’s “freedom” from Spanish rule in 1898 whispers — but only on occasion shouts — “colony.”

I’ve even used the word “ho” in disgust to describe the losing end of this uneven relationship.

But Trump yells “ho” through a bullhorn, wirelessly hinged to arena speakers and transmitted to the outer regions of the known universe through electronic pulses.

There’s no subtlety to his game. There’s no filter.

Just before leaving the White House, President Barack Obama granted clemency to Oscar Lopez Rivera, a Puerto Rican separatist who fought to free his homeland from the United States.

But did you see Obama propose statehood or anything else to lift P.R. from its ho status?

That’s an American President with highly-functional filters — freeing a leader of hos as a goodwill gesture but still keeping all the hos, including the freed one, in their place.

On the other hand, it’s hard to have a filter adjustment problem where a filter doesn’t exist …

And this is where Trump’s Niger grieving problem comes in.

The simple fact that Trump has spent more time trying to hand out Twitter and TV news beatdowns of critics who say Trump hasn’t properly grieved the deaths of Staff Sgt. Bryan C. Black, Staff Sgt. Jeremiah W. Johnson, Sgt. La David Johnson and Staff Sgt. Dustin M. Wright in Niger — rather than simply letting his actions speak grief while shutting down pundits along the way — points to an unsurprising lack of concern for the troops he deploys to face death.

And he can’t hide this lack of concern. No filters.

UPS overnight deliveries of condolences?

It’s hard to have a filter adjustment problem where a filter doesn’t exist …

I’m sure some of you will say Trump’s White House predecessors clearly demonstrated sorrow when watching the still bodies of teenagers, mothers, fathers and community leaders, returned home.

I can’t tell you what ran through the minds of those commanders in chief.

But I wonder out loud the amount of sorrow three, possibly five, US Presidents felt when learning that they were committing tens of thousand of US soldiers to die, along with up to two million civilians, based on a made-up story about American warships being attacked.

Or the amount of sorrow a President felt whenever a soldier died at the hands of a terror group where the President was warned that his chosen policy course would give birth to the same group he would eventually have to fight.

Or the level of grief a President felt whenever he saw the flag-draped casket of a service member whose death was the direct result of a war that was based on a series of lies.

Or when the approximately 160,000 deaths of US soldiers — personnel a president committed to a war in one regional theater — was precipitated by the deaths of 2,300 people in an attack where the President was warned in advance multiple times, but ignored these warnings out of a eagerness to fight.

The difference between these Presidents and Trump is in the way they can throw on the grieve filter to obscure the scent of an idea that the wars they’ve declared were conveniently wrapped in “bad intelligence” and false flags.

Trump is different: he’s the most unfiltered American president in modern US history …

song currently stuck in my head: “salbutamol (s. moreira remix)” – schematix

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